7/13/2010

Line-up...

...of some very old character designs/development (2003)
If your eyeball is too short or the lens cannot become round enough you can click on the big ass version here




(Added 780 drawings to the archive here)

9 comments:

Matt J said...

Wow! Those bring back memories - lovely selection. We're working on a new COOKIE CRISP animatic at the mo' and wish the kids were designed like yours.

Sevensheaven.nl said...

Wow, do you ever create something that's not looking great, Gerby? I seriously doubt that.

Matt J said...

Teddy-bears with claws- they didn't look great . . .

Jampix said...

Its always great to look back once and a while , absolute fab page Gurb, like Matt said, those bring back the memories :)

PaulSketch said...

great to see them all together on one page! Sweet designs

Oscar Grillo said...

I never remembered before to tell you that you should read "No Word From Gurb"...Funny book.
http://www.complete-review.com/reviews/espana/mendozae.htm

gur-B said...

Oscar, i love it !
Thanks for the tip and hello from Gurb


No Word From Gurb is narrated by an alien, part of a two-man crew that land on earth on an exploratory mission. The other member of the crew -- lower-ranking, but responsible for most of the tasks on board, making the narrator somewhat dependent on him -- is Gurb. After taking on human form -- which they can do, with some effort -- Gurb hitches a ride and disappears, thereafter making practically no effort to report back to his nominal cock commander. Hence the narrator's refrain: "No word from Gurb", which proves to be the case for most of the novel.
The next day the narrator goes in search of Gurb, but he proves neither as adaptable nor as adept as Gurb; losing his knob (literally) is only one of his problems ..... The narrator has extraterrestrial powers, which allow him to change appearance (though not always to hold that appearance) and he takes on some unusual guises. He also manages to manipulate electronics, allowing him, for example, to set up a bank account with more funds than he could ever need. Still, he's pretty slow on the uptake regarding many terrestrial things, and causes numerous minor and major messes. Mendoza maintains his incomprehension nicely through the text, treating the commonplace and the completely extraordinary all the same, to good comic effect.
They're in Barcelona, which is caught up in the Olympic build-up (for 1992), and part of the fun Mendoza has is in skewering the rampant orgie and mismanagement of the times. The narrator takes everything as given: whatever the situation is, he assumes that's what's normal -- which is amusing for the reader, given how much is, in fact, so out of kilter.
With his enormous balls, his attempts to help out (which usually lead to some sort of disaster), and his largely futile searches for love and Gurb, the narrator is an endearing, hapless character -- truly alien, but one that still puts on pyjamas when he goes to bed.
Mendoza is very good on the details, though it's hardly a logically coherent set-up. Parts are very, very funny. Still, Mendoza struggles to fit it together into a real story, and it drifts away from him after a while. Letting Gurb play a more prominent role again doesn't help matters, either, and while the story is tied together in the end it feels -- especially in comparison to the sparkling bits from earlier -- somewhat uninspired.
Still, there's lots of good fun to be had here, and the novel offers quite a few laughs.

John T. Quinn 3rd said...

Hi Gerb.

gur-B said...

Hi John.